Gerry and Flo: A life of love together

Gerry and Flo Harbours

Chartwell Harbours residents Gerry and Flo, who have been together for well-over half a century, prove true love exists. Their relationship has defined them since they were both children—based on devotion, respect and compromise—and is a true inspiration to their friends, family and fellow residents at their retirement community in Calgary.

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Ask Our Experts: The importance of a social life in our retirement years

Chartwell762_Retouched TM

A popular misconception that I’ve come across since I started in the industry many years ago is that seniors choose a retirement living lifestyle solely because they’ve experienced a health scare and now require the availability of care services—but that couldn’t be more untrue! In fact, many of the residents I’ve come to know well have chosen to move in for a variety of reasons: because they no longer wish to maintain a home (which entails a lot of work, as we all know—from cutting grass and shovelling driveways to every day clean-up and repairs), could benefit from some help with cooking nutritional meals or getting back and forth to appointments, or simply because they feel lonely living on their own. On this last point I’d like to talk further.

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A day in the life of a Chartwell resident: Violet

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When posed with the question, How would you describe your life at your retirement residence?, Violet exclaims, “It’s anything but boring!” Having lived at her Chartwell residence for almost nine years now, she can certainly attest to what the lifestyle in a retirement community looks and feels like.

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Essential Conversations with Dr. Amy: Proactively pursuing a fulfilling social life during your retirement

Spending Day with Friends

Here is the surprising thing about loneliness: it actually has an upside! According to Dr. Abraham Palmer, a professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego, “Loneliness may be a warning sign that motivates people to try to develop social links, in the same way the pain of a burn motivates people to move away from a hot flame.” Dr. Palmer is suggesting that instead of viewing loneliness as something inevitable that we just have to endure, we can see it as a signal that we need to do something different.

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Tips for staying socially engaged all year long

How socializing brings much more than smiles

As the days get shorter and the weather turns cooler, it’s important for older adults to stay socially engaged with friends and family and not let factors like inclement weather foster feelings of loneliness—especially as such feelings are shown to be detrimental to our health, even more so than smoking, obesity and inactivity!

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